Thursday, March 21, 2013

PURELY PIXIE: a princess-sleeve abaya for work?

Now the thing about Omani women is they can wear anything to work. Legally they are free to don abaya or not. Culturally, you cannot say that is so, but legally yes. Despite, abayas are the major form of fashion especially in Muscat, the capital where I live. Omani women wear all kinds of abayas to work. Sparkly, trashy, too-tight, modest and beyond plain, designer, not designer, tacky, awesome, chic. Ect... I remain somewhat Western in that I hesitate to wear princess sleeves to work. I question the practicality. Case in point, this awtar abaya:
 Being that it is plain black it is perfect for a casual day at work. Being that it is designer and made of a nice fabric (ignore the fact that I did not iron it for this mock-photo shoot) it can also be dressed up and suitable for non-casual days at work. So..... I tested it. And yes, I conclude I can happily and safely wear princess sleeves to work in an office setting. I don't recommend though if you are a chef for a living or anything that involves moving machinery.
 The best part of this awtar abaya is the lace at the neck (which normally I cover with my shayla so no one even knows it is there). It is a pretty high-quality lace. It look nice though at a ladies-only party with cute earrings and a killer up-do as well though soooo... [And the Western-part in me hates the sewn on name-brand tags---if this wouldn't leave a big gaping hole in the abaya fabric I'd cut it off]:
 Yes, that is my actual office pictured above. I can't live without my Omani coffee in the mornings (I drink the whole pot by myself to the chagrin of any Khaleeji in-the-know about this dreadful addiction/habit of mine). Below, I offer my readers a very brief tour of my work:

6 comments:

Maymunah said...

Oh wow, your workplace is beautiful, great architecture, and so big and green and clean. The lace on that abaya is very pretty too.

Pixie said...

Maymuah: it is. I wish so beyond badly that you could come work with me but they banned niqab on campus sooo:'(

Stacy aka Fahiima said...

Thanks for sharing a part of your world! What did you use for the design on your hands? I can tell its not henna, but probably not black hair dye either.

Pixie said...

Stacey: lol, Pen. I was bored and started trying to draw a Sudanese henna design;). I never use black henna and believe it is haram because of a hadith. I also suck at henna.

Anonymous said...

Assalam alaykum sister, big sleeves indeed! Not practical and neither good as well going out or you have to wear a long black shirt underneath or the likes. This type of abaya is very unprictical while shopping don't even mention driving! Unfortunatlly I see many ladies nowadays walking around in wide sleeves abayas that come down at any occasions, frankly makes me cringe, not very modest having all your front harms e pose in that way. About that 'black' henna there are no such things as henna is a plant and we all know it is reddish brown in color. It is sadly black dye many ladies used and it is quite dangerous, their skins seems to be handling it but I met sisters who got burned by it. I was 'forced' to put it on by peer pressure and didnt like it at all , do ot even mention the sensation of my skin burning and falling off while drying, the result was hideous to me!

Pixie said...

Wa alaykom e salaam ramatullahi wa barakto anonymous: I don't have to wear anything underneath of it. Any good tailor will add snaps so it doesn't fall open. My abayas all close at the wrists even with wide sleeves. And we all know there is no black henna. What I have is just a drawing on my hands, regular ballpoint pen lol